When Trusting God isn’t Warm and Fuzzy

A few days ago I was pacing around my well-worn prayer path in the backyard. My thoughts were flowing, but the words weren’t coming. The particular trial on my mind was one I had mulled over for months. I had prayed all the prayers, cried all the tears. There just didn’t seem to be anything left to say. Fresh pain doesn’t always come with fresh, creative prayers.

I reached inside my brain and dug around in the mommy-fog. I found a verse I knew well, harkening back to my days in Sunday School and AWANA. Since my own words were failing me at the moment, I repeated the verse over and over.

“Trust in the Lord with all your heart and do not lean on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge Him, and He will make your path straight.” Proverbs 3:5-6

I’ve known this passage for 30 years, so the last thing I expected was for something new to jump out at me. But it did. Up until that point, I had always summed up this passage in one word: Trust. It was a call to action on my part. It meant that if I wanted peace, I had to believe harder. I had to beat some sense into my weak faith and tell it to get a grip, get with the program. To me it meant that true peace was always attainable, but only if I trusted hard enough.

The problem was, I was focusing on my trust instead of the object of my trust. I was doing the opposite of what the passage said. I was leaning on my own understanding.

This time, a different word jumped out at me: Acknowledge. To acknowledge simply means to admit that something is true. For example, in this passage, we are to acknowledge God. “You are God.” That’s it. That is all the information we need to trust God.

I had glossed over this word dozens, if not hundreds of times before. Why? It’s simply because…it was too simple. I think I like simple, but I don’t really. I want all the details before I trust God with something. I want to know all the what’s and the why’s, and every possible outcome. But I don’t need to know any of that to trust God. All I need to know is, “You are God.”

Trusting God doesn’t mean having all the warm and fuzzy feelings, or suddenly knowing exactly how everything is going to work out. Trusting God means acknowledging who He is. When you can’t think of any possible resolution to the trial you are in, say, “You are God.” When you look around for your faith and it’s nowhere to be found, say, “You are God.” God gives something better than answers to all our earthly, insufficient questions. He gives peace that surpasses all comprehension that guards our hearts and minds. (Philippians 4:7)

We cannot make our own paths straight. That’s God’s job. Our job is to acknowledge Him. Trusting God has nothing to do with how we feel. It’s all about Who we know.

 

Books by Sara Wallace

FIFBP 4

For the Love of Discipline: When the Gospel Meets Tantrums and Time-Outs

“The culmination of 30 years of evangelical thinking about parenting. Clear guidelines, great illustrations, and very practical. – Pastor Steve, Atlanta
“I highlighted so many of the pages, and started implementing some of her ideas right away!” – Ashley Hughes, mother of three

4

The Gospel-Centered Mom

“By far the best parenting book I have ever read. Wallace writes as a relatable mom and offers helpful tips while always bringing everything back to the Gospel. This is a short, easy-to-read devotional, with life-changing nuggets in every chapter.” – Amazon reviewer

One thought on “When Trusting God isn’t Warm and Fuzzy

  1. I love this so much! It is amazing how God’s word is truly living and that new things can stick out to us even after reading or thinking on the same passage countless times before. What a wonderful reminder- to acknowledge that He is God and we are not. Good truth for my weary-trying-to-control-everything-too-much soul.

    Like

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